BIAC Profiles Adjustment

Thank you for completing the BIAC Profiles Assessment. You will have received your feedback report and you might be asking what you can do with the information contained in this report. It may be very beneficial for you to look at some of your behaviours and adjust them in order for you to be more effective in what you do. Your company will also offer support, encouragement and recognition for undergoing this process.

The BIAC Profiles Adjustment Process allows you to adjust some of your thinking and approach to certain situations. It concentrates on those ineffective behaviours that are either too high or too low and gives some practical steps to making the adjustments. It will also suggest a plan so that you can keep track of the progress you are making in your change plan.

It is important to remember that you cannot change everything at once.


Adjustment Report for John Citizen

 Too Low Approval Behaviour

People who have little approval in their beliefs will always place the importance of completing or achieving a task over the feelings of people. They are relatively unconcerned with being popular; indeed they are often accused of being cynical or hostile in their approach. Low approval types can create a barrier around them, insofar as employees or colleagues are afraid to admit failure and seek support, making themselves unapproachable in colleague’s eyes.

  • Making Adjustments
  • Commence a change process by admitting and realising your dependence on people – colleagues and/or employees.
  • A wonderful exercise is to take your key job/role responsibilities and write in where successful achievement is part or totally dependent on the help and support of others. In the vast majority of roles, this dependency is quite extensive.
  • Moving towards greater motivation of people requires clarity of direction, patience, appreciation of effort and above all a friendly approach.

  • Some Practical Steps

    • At briefings and meetings avoid becoming impatient or hostile to colleagues voicing concern or hesitancy.
    • Ensure all possible major impediments or obstacles to a plan are allowed to be aired and surmounted.
    • Write notes of appreciation where exceptional effort has been made – irrespective of the success or otherwise of the task.
    • Relax more in others company – smiling can help you accomplish a lot.


     Too High Perfectionistic Behaviour

    High irrational perfectionistic behaviour will demonstrate a total absorption with order and structure. Systems become paramount, with no room at all for deviation or short cuts.
    As examples, the shopping list will become detailed to the point of providing stock checks, price checks and not just product listing but actual brand and packet listings. The meeting agenda becomes absorbed with starting and finishing times for each item, detail on every input, etc.
    The person is absorbed with detail, pushing himself and others to the point of exasperation, also punishing himself and others on failure on the detail rather than the big picture.
    Very high perfectionistic beliefs can move to paranoia, constantly straightening pictures, re-arranging items on desks, creating more and more detailed report systems and so on. The reality is that this type of behaviour is extremely stressful and actually slows outputs down.

    • Making Adjustments

      • Move towards achieving results through realistic steps rather than those which are over-detailed or too demanding.
      • Begin to realise that it is often wise to sacrifice some unnecessary detail in the interest of reaching solid results.
      • When planning tasks or objectives, look constantly at reducing the actual numbers of steps planned – limit the plan to key essential steps. Where possible seek help or advice on this.
      • Become adept at recognising for yourself when your beliefs are moving into the irrational zone. This is really the key to overall success as you move into a more skilled readjustment approach.
      • Try to avoid unnecessary cross-checking and re-arranging of detail for both yourself and, where relevant, others.
      • Accept or submit a more broadbrush result that can demonstrate achievement of overall key objectives rather than a lot of detail.
      • When interacting or presenting to others, limit the delivery to key features or facts – provide detail as a follow-up only if required.
      • Remember the key maxim of successful presentations – “never present more than four key features of a product or service at a time”.

    • Some Practical Steps

      • Commence the reduction of high perfectionistic thinking through a series of relatively safe, experimental, trial approaches.
      • Select tasks which are usually time-consuming but low in terms of overall impact:

        • Re-designing a reporting system, or planning an internal briefing
        • Re-organising a filing system, etc.

      • Reduce the steps normally involved in these tasks to the absolute minimum required for a successful completion.
      • Set yourself a realistic but faster deadline to complete or deliver the process or presentation.
      • Avoid over-checking and doubling back on achievements completed.
      • Ensure the task is directed towards a more topline, faster, user-friendly, but thorough accurate result, rather than an over detailed, slow and perhaps more complex approach that delivers the same result over a much longer timeframe.



     Too Low Appraising Behaviour

    Low Appraising behaviour is usually concerned with giving people third, fourth or even more chances. They tend to sometimes act naively only seeing the good in everyone. Sadly, their poor ability to correctly assess behaviour and attitudes in others leads low judgemental believers to often feel let down. As managers, they can take the blame for others inefficiencies and disloyalty.

    • Making Adjustments

      • Realise that in a surprising number of cases, your own initial hunches and instincts may be correct.
      • Commence a process of ensuring colleagues or employees prove their loyalty and ability before leaping in to defend their mistakes and/or inadequacies.

    • Practical Steps

      • Select some recent examples where you had a feeling of being let down or disappointed at a colleague or employees response to a commitment made to you personally.
      • List out the actual steps involved from briefing stage, commitment given, support offered and actual results.
      • Make a detached assessment of where the actual blame for failure lies. Seek the help of a trusted colleague or partner in this process if possible. Again, you may be surprised at how little credit you give yourself and how your low appraising beliefs has led you to accept unreasonable excuses.
      • In future remind yourself of your tendency to avoid analysis of actual behaviour against desired behaviour in others and make judgments on what is real rather than what is ideal.



     Too Low Controlling Behaviour

    Being too low on controlling means giving way and allowing others to take complete control and dictate your approach to making key decisions. Very low controlling beliefs leads to behaviour which empowers colleagues or customers to the point that they take over and dictate to you the terms, conditions and overall approach on most issues.
    Describing very low controlling thinkers, customers or indeed colleagues will say he or she cannot make a decision or a stand on any issue. For the person themselves, the stress from this type of behaviour can be quite severe as there is often an inner feeling of disappointment with their own performance and a sense of being put upon.

    • Making Adjustments

      • When increasing controlling effectiveness from a low base, it is important to realise that giant steps will not simply work. The transition is too great.
      • Start by taking control of areas that are relatively non-contentious and are within your expected role requirements.

    • Some Practical Steps

      • In a selling role, take more command of customer meetings and presentations by agreeing an agenda at the beginning of the meeting and concentrate more on effective closing to secure commitments at the end.
      • When dealing with colleagues or employees again set an agenda that allows you to say your say and also sum up on the findings and agreed steps to take.
      • In real terms the most practical step of all is to realise that your thinking and behaviour currently allows others to take charge and you need to take back some of this control to allow you to make a greater contribution and free you from unnecessary anxiety and stress.



     Too Low Avoidance Behaviour

    People who are too low in avoidance thinking and behaviour believe it is a weakness on their part ever to hesitate on making a decision. They tend to jump straight in and the results can often times be unfortunate. To ‘sleep on something’ even if it is important and not necessarily urgent is an anathema as far as low avoidance types are concerned. They can also prove disruptive within an organisation, particularly if they are involved in team activity, as they tend to create unnecessary pressure leading to errors and even panic.
    The stress and pressure which very low avoidance thinkers heap upon themselves is significant and damaging.

    • Making Adjustments

      • In simple terms, think twice before making important decisions or taking actions. Being seen to hesitate is not a weakness, particularly if the perceived outcome of the decision is high in risk or cost or both. ‘I have formed the habit of always counting to five’ is how a low avoidance thinker described how he successfully moved into the centred zone.

    • Some Practical Steps

      • Identify all decisions or required actions into high or low risk categories. You will quickly form your own accurate assessment on most pending decisions.
      • Commit yourself to always giving high risk actions or decisions some additional time and space to ensure accuracy and practicality on delivery.
      • If possible, allow a trusted colleague or partner the freedom to be constructively critical of your progress and success.



     Too Low Retrospective Behaviour

    People who are too low in avoidance thinking and behaviour believe it is a weakness on their part ever to hesitate on making a decision. They tend to jump straight in and the results can often times be unfortunate. To ‘sleep on something’ even if it is important and not necessarily urgent is an anathema as far as low avoidance types are concerned. They can also prove disruptive within an organisation, particularly if they are involved in team activity, as they tend to create unnecessary pressure leading to errors and even panic.
    The stress and pressure which very low avoidance thinkers heap upon themselves is significant and damaging.

    • Making Adjustments

      • In simple terms, think twice before making important decisions or taking actions. Being seen to hesitate is not a weakness, particularly if the perceived outcome of the decision is high in risk or cost or both. ‘I have formed the habit of always counting to five’ is how a low avoidance thinker described how he successfully moved into the centred zone.

    • Some Practical Steps

      • Identify all decisions or required actions into high or low risk categories. You will quickly form your own accurate assessment on most pending decisions.
      • Commit yourself to always giving high risk actions or decisions some additional time and space to ensure accuracy and practicality on delivery.
      • If possible, allow a trusted colleague or partner the freedom to be constructively critical of your progress and success.





    BIAC Profiles Adjustment Change Plan

    Now you have received your BIAC Profiles Thinking Styles Profile with suggested adjustment steps you might like to follow the following steps to help you manage any behavioural change.

    1. Select the styles which are most ineffective for special concentration and attention
    2. Select one or two behaviours to adjust at first and when you have successfully implemented the changes you desire move on to the next ones
    3. Link any behavioural change where possible to real life situations in your work or private life
    4. Recognise your effective styles and the positive way they impact on you
    5. If at all possible share your progress with those who know you well, invite feedback from trusted friends and colleagues
    6. It may be worth booking some protective space and time for yourself on a weely basis to review your progress and success.

    We hope you enjoyed the BIAC Profiles experience and that it has worked successfully for you.